the nameless book tag

I’m stealing this tag from R.M. Archer, who stole it from someone else and then invited stealing. There aren’t really any rules, so I actually changed some things… and here we go!

>>> MY ANSWERS <<<

1. What book has been on your shelf the longest?

I’m not sure the exact answer to this question… but it’s probably my very well-worn copy of The Hobbit from when I was seven. That or A Little Princess, the cost of which my sister and I split because we got it from the library and loved it so much that we just had to own it.

2. What are your current read, your last read, and your book to read next?

Current read: The Drowned Vault by N.D. Wilson – a well-deserved reread

Last read: A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson – finally finished the super-long (fourteen books!) Wheel of Time series after nine months

Next read: I’m not sure? Probably the next Ashtown Burial (Empire of Bones) or a nonfiction book that I’ve been reading called Why They Can’t Write. Plus a long list of books I own (The Lucky Few, the Auralia Thread, Seeker, The Gift of Fire…) and books I don’t (Children of Blood and Bone, Caraval, The Blue Castle, Romanov…). So, I don’t know, but I have plenty of choices.

3. What book did everyone like but you hated?

I don’t often hate books. But I don’t really like the How to Train Your Dragon books (too much crude humor, in my opinion), or the Ramona books, or the Magic Tree house books.

4. What book do you keep telling yourself you’ll read, but you probably won’t?

I refuse to admit that any books on my TBR will not be read!

(But probably, very long old classic books like Oliver Twist and The Pilgrim’s Progress will have to wait much longer than they deserve before I finish them.)

5. What books are you saving for retirement?

None! I’m going to keep on reading until I die, and I’m not “saving” any books until I retire. I’m just reading and reading, and whatever’s left when I retire is what I’ll be reading then. (Because I hope to have more free time then, though, it will definitely include lots of rereads of my favorites from childhood, and time spent on long books/series that I’m afraid to start lest I have no time to finish them.)

6. Last page: read it first or wait until the end?

What I should do: wait until the end.

What I want to do: read the whole page, and the page before it, and the one before that…

What I actually do: read the last sentence/word, or at the very least, take a peek at the final bit just to see what I’m in for. If I’m reading a book I’ve read before, or one I’m not particularly loving, then I don’t check the end at all; but if I’m super excited/afraid of the end, I can’t resist glancing at it.

7. Acknowledgements: waste of ink or interesting aside?

PERFECT ENDING. It’s so hard to let go of a book you love, and reading the acknowledgements gives you a glance into the author’s process and what he/she cares about as well as offering an opportunity to read just a little more of the book. (I’ve already written the acknowledgements for my novel, though I haven’t finished it yet…)

8. Which book character would you switch places with?

Well, there are plenty of characters I admire, but in terms of choosing a character whose life I think I’d actually enjoy, here are some options:

  • Hermione Granger, after the end of Deathly Hallows
  • Laura Ingalls Wilder, after These Happy Golden Years but before The First Four Years
  • Jo March (but I’d probably marry Laurie)
  • Anne Shirley in Anne of the Island
  • Emily Starr in Emily Climbs (and I would so make Teddy propose!)

9. Do you have a book that reminds you of something specific in your life (place, person, time, etc.)?

Oh, tons! Reading The Warden and the Wolf King always brings me back sitting on the couch, hiding under a blanket so my face wouldn’t spoil the ending for my family (I’d already read it to myself but it was our read-aloud at the time). The entire Harry Potter series holds the memory of waiting, waiting, waiting for the next chapter (reading the whole thing aloud was excruciating but totally worth it). I read A Time to Die at a performing arts group meeting and I vividly remember the organized chaos.

And that’s only a few. Every book holds specific memories and moments for me.

10. Name a book you acquired in an interesting way.

I bought The Elfstones of Shannara for a quarter at a garage sale. It turned out to be a sequel series to the original Shannara trilogy, which I wasn’t impressed with. I still haven’t read Elfstones.

11. Have you ever given a book to a special person for a special reason?

What qualifies as a special reason? I give books to people for presents all the time, usually because I want them to read them. I gave Cinder to my friend for her birthday and The Mysterious Howling to my brother for his.

12. Which book has been with you the most places?

I’m known as “the girl who always brings a book with her,” so I’m not sure how to judge this. The number of places a book goes with me is usually proportionate to the amount of time I took to read it. Some of the books that took me the longest to read are The Lord of the Rings (the first time through), The Path of Daggers, and Northanger Abbey, so maybe one of those?

13. Any required reading you hated in high school but wasn’t so bad later?

Still being in high school, I haven’t yet had the opportunity to experience this, but I have a feeling that Thucydides will be better the second time through, assuming I have the courage to tackle him again. And I know I’ll appreciate Homer and Vergil more when I can take the time to enjoy them instead of just reading to finish a chapter.

14. Used or brand new books?

I don’t care, as long as I can read it. Most of my books are new, but used ones are great when I’m looking for old, out-of-print books. I usually read library books anyway. Those probably count as used.

15. Have you ever read a Dan Brown book?

No, and I had to look him up to find out what he writes…

16. Have you seen a movie that you liked better than the book?

Yes! How to Train Your Dragon was soooo much more interesting, aesthetically pleasing, character-driven, and enjoyable than its book counterpart.

17. Have you read a book that made you hungry?

I don’t know if I’ve ever actually been moved to hunger by written words, but Narnia, LOTR, Anne of Green Gables, and the Wingfeather Saga all have mouthwatering descriptions that made me wish I could eat with the characters.

18. Is there a person whose book advice you always trust?

My mother is almost always right about books, so even though we have different genre tastes, if she recommends a book to me, I know it’s good.

19. Is there a book out of your comfort zone or favorite genre that you ended up loving?

I really, really like the Ender’s Game and Ender’s Shadow series, even though I usually prefer fantasy to scifi. And I also really liked Laddie by Gene Stratton-Porter, even though it was a really long, really old historical fiction book that I didn’t expect to enjoy.

20. BONUS QUESTION: What’s a book you’ve read that you don’t think would make a good movie?

(I added this question, by the way, because I don’t think I’ve ever heard anyone ask it before, but I often read books and think they wouldn’t make good movies.)

Some of my thoughts for this one: the Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan (because it’s soooo long with so many characters whose complexities and interactions simply couldn’t be contained/understood on the screen). Fawkes by Nadine Brandes (because so much of the dialogue is internal/magical/inaudible, and the most important things that happen to the main character are not flashy fights or big reveals, but talking and thinking and deliberating. Plus the descriptions are just so gorgeous and it would be impossible to get that kind of beauty on a screen for me). And, although I know many people have been hoping for it, The Green Ember by S.D. Smith just doesn’t seem like it would make a good movie: either it would be very animated-looking (I suppose hand-drawn could be interesting, but it would have to be well done) and fake, or it would look so realistic that I wouldn’t be able to get over the fact that it’s rabbits. With swords. For some reason the idea of walking, talking rabbits has always confused/messed with me. I can’t picture it and I’m not sure I’d like to see how someone else pictures it on a big screen.

>>> THE RULES <<<

  • Thank the person who tagged you (or if no one did, then mention either R.M. Archer, me, or someone else who’s written about/done this tag).
  • Answer the 20 questions.
  • EITHER add a bonus question OR change one of the questions to suit you. Or do both, if you’d like.
  • Tag other people.

>>> THE QUESTIONS <<<

  1. What book have you owned the longest?
  2. What are your current read, your last read, and your book to read next?
  3. What book do you have an unpopular opinion about?
  4. What book do you keep telling yourself you’ll read, but you probably won’t?
  5. What book(s) do you think you’ll like better when you’re older?
  6. Last page: read it first, give it a furtive glance, or wait until the end?
  7. Acknowledgements: waste of ink, interesting aside, or amazing insight?
  8. Which book character would you switch places with, and when (in their story)?
  9. Do you have a book that reminds you of something specific in your life (place, person, time, etc.)?
  10. Name a book you acquired in an interesting way.
  11. Have you ever given a book to someone but then borrowed it to read it yourself? (Yes, I changed this one… because I have.)
  12. Which book has been with you the most places?
  13. Any required reading you hated when you had to read it, but enjoyed when you picked it up again later?
  14. Do you prefer used or brand new books?
  15. Have you ever read a Rabbit Room Press book? (What counts: books by Andrew Peterson, A.S. Peterson, Jonathan Rogers, Douglas McKelvey, Jennifer Trafton, or anything published by Rabbit Room Press. You can also make a case for books published by Story Warren Press, books reviewed on the Rabbit Room/Story Warren, and books by authors who are friends of the Rabbit Room, like Helena Sorensen, Jeffrey Overstreet, and N.D. Wilson.)
  16. Have you seen a movie that you liked better than the book?
  17. Have you read a book that made you laugh, cry, or both?
  18. Is there a person whose book recommendations you always trust?
  19. Is there a book out of your comfort zone or favorite genre that you ended up loving?
  20. BONUS QUESTION: What’s a book you’ve read that you don’t think would make a good movie?

>>> TAGS! <<<

Jo @ Pananaw

Astrid @ Astrid Adams

Liana @ Tomorrow

And… you! Anyone who has a blog is welcome to do this tag. And I invite you to share your answers to any of these questions in the comments. I’d love to talk to you!

In Christ,

maya

One thought on “the nameless book tag

  1. Ooh! Ooh! The Shannara books (and Terry Brooks’ Landover books, too) launched me into reading fantasy. If I remember right the first few books have more of an old-fashioned writing style to them, so I don’t think I’d enjoy them so much now as I did then, but I really enjoyed the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy that comes later down the road, so if the writing wasn’t your thing you might try those. Or if the demons put you off; I don’t think the VotJS trilogy has those either. Or it could just be an overall thing, which is totally cool too. 🙂
    I love your take on acknowledgements! That’s such a lovely way of looking at it. ^-^

    Liked by 1 person

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