the Narnia tag // feat. me fangirling + I need to reread the series

Hey, friends of Narnia! (At least I hope you’re a friend of Narnia. If you’re not… allow this post to turn you into one. ;)) Today I’m doing a tag that I first saw on Jenna Terese’s blog (and also Kendra Lynne’s), and was then tagged for by Ryan Elizabeth, who informed me that it was created by S.J. Barnard! (Go check out all those blogs. They’re amazing.)

It is, obviously, the Narnia tag, and I’m so excited!

(Also, I haven’t blogged for way too long. I’m just so happy to be posting again.)

I first discovered Narnia at age six when my dad read the books to my little sister and me, and I appreciate them more and more as I get older. They’re true masterpieces of literature (*glares at Tolkien*) and I love them to death. (Well, not literally to death. But, you know. A lot.) I actually, well, haven’t read them in far too long, so we’ll see how much I remember 😉

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poets to read // several names that belong on your (virtual) bookshelf

Tally ho, readers and poets!

C.M. asked me the other day about what sort of poetry I like to read, and while typing out my comment in reply, I realized that I could write quite a long blog post about it. So I did.

Since we’re all (still) stuck at home, I think this post will be helpful; almost all of the poetry I’m going to mention is available for free online (on websites and blogs).

The title of this post is my attempt at parodying Douglas Wilson’s Writers to Read: Nine Names that Belong on Your Bookshelf (which is itself a book that ought to be on your bookshelf).

Without further introduction, allow me to recommend to you several poets whose work deserves your attention.

Disclaimer: though I quote from several poets in this post, I do not own the rights to any of their poetry. I have not quoted any poem in its entirety unless it is in the public domain; otherwise, I have quoted only one or less stanzas and have linked to the source of the poem. (“Wolves” by Nikita Gill was found on Goodreads, as a quote from Wild Embers.)
If you are the author of any of this poetry, and you don’t want me to quote from your poem in my post, please comment or contact me and let me know and I’ll take it down.

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poets of the Bible

The Bible is full of wonderful poetry. Even if you’re not a Christian, it’s worth reading for its literary and historical value. Check out this website for an introduction to Hebrew poetry. Here are some of my favorites:

Isaiah

For you shall go out in joy
and be led forth in peace;
the mountains and the hills before you
shall break forth into singing,
and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.
Instead of the thorn shall come up the cypress;
instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle;
and it shall make a name for the Lord,
an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off.

// Isaiah 55:12-13 ESV //

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