blog tour + book review // Fifteen by Amie Woleslagle

Hello hello, lovely readers! Today I’m participating in the amazing Amie Anne’s blog tour for her book Fifteen. The book is a collection of poetry about mental health, and *squeals* I got to read it!! It’s beautiful and important and I can’t wait to tell you what I thought. But first — the book info:

You’re not alone

You’re not the only person who struggles with mental health issues, not the only person with demons floating in your mind. Amie Woleslagle wrote Fifteen because she deals with them as well. Not to fix your pain, but to reach out and hold your hand. To remind you that you are not alone, to ask you to stay and make the world a better place. Because the world will never be the same without you and your unique take on life. Fifteen is a book of poems crafted from one teenager dealing with mental health issues to another teenager in the same place. It walks through the battle of pretending to be okay, of having people you thought were trustworthy shatter your heart, and the battle of not giving in when your brain has given up. Fifteen covers true friendships, embracing joy, self acceptance, and living your faith while struggling with mental illness, all the while showing that, in the end, flowers will bloom in the ashes of your pain. 

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Waiting Spaces by Acacia Mitchell // poetry book review + launch!

Hey there, my friends! I’m excited today to talk about my friend Acacia Mitchell’s poetry book, Waiting Spaces. I was honored to be a beta reader for it and I can’t wait for more people to read it!

As you may know, I’m a huge fan of modern, lyrical poetry, and Acacia’s was just right for me. I’m going to tell you all about why I loved it — after I tell you about it and its author (:

about the book

We have all waited.  

While searching for answers. Staying in places of rest and growth, or unsure of where to call home.

Waiting Spaces explores the feelings of waiting through poetical thought and spoken word. 

Each poem is written as a letter to those who are in their own spaces of waiting. 

Perhaps you will find one written to you. 

buy with color illustrations | buy with black and white illustrations

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home // island living, II

I remember hours spent cowering in corners, hiding futilely from the waves, battered to and fro by sprays of saltwater that felt like curses. Slipping away from the storms and trying to be safe but never, never able to. 

Now I’m here on my own and the feeling of safety is pervasive all around me. 

Now I’m here and I get to build my own — 

my 

own

home. Read More »

poets to read // several names that belong on your (virtual) bookshelf

Tally ho, readers and poets!

C.M. asked me the other day about what sort of poetry I like to read, and while typing out my comment in reply, I realized that I could write quite a long blog post about it. So I did.

Since we’re all (still) stuck at home, I think this post will be helpful; almost all of the poetry I’m going to mention is available for free online (on websites and blogs).

The title of this post is my attempt at parodying Douglas Wilson’s Writers to Read: Nine Names that Belong on Your Bookshelf (which is itself a book that ought to be on your bookshelf).

Without further introduction, allow me to recommend to you several poets whose work deserves your attention.

Disclaimer: though I quote from several poets in this post, I do not own the rights to any of their poetry. I have not quoted any poem in its entirety unless it is in the public domain; otherwise, I have quoted only one or less stanzas and have linked to the source of the poem. (“Wolves” by Nikita Gill was found on Goodreads, as a quote from Wild Embers.)
If you are the author of any of this poetry, and you don’t want me to quote from your poem in my post, please comment or contact me and let me know and I’ll take it down.

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poets of the Bible

The Bible is full of wonderful poetry. Even if you’re not a Christian, it’s worth reading for its literary and historical value. Check out this website for an introduction to Hebrew poetry. Here are some of my favorites:

Isaiah

For you shall go out in joy
and be led forth in peace;
the mountains and the hills before you
shall break forth into singing,
and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.
Instead of the thorn shall come up the cypress;
instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle;
and it shall make a name for the Lord,
an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off.

// Isaiah 55:12-13 ESV //

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Camp NaNo 2020, days 2-4

As you can see, posting every day is not happening.

This is for two reasons. The first: I don’t want to share everything I write this month because I have a feeling I may want to publish some of it, use it in a current novel, or something of the sort.

The second: I simply keep not having the time or energy to post.

Anyway, I wrote three more poems and several thousand more words about what happened to Aionladon before he was in the cell (see my previous post). I’m going to share little bits of it with you (but not everything. for the aforementioned reason #1).divider

poetry

photo of moon during night

day 2: dare

When everywhere the night has fallen
And days are only memories

(That’s all you’re getting. I’m majorly dissatisfied with this poem… I think I’ll write some better poetry after I get back into the swing of writing poetry every day.)Read More »

admission // a poem

Sometimes — 

always —

it’s hard to admit you’re wrong. 

Hard to let a dream die. 

You hold it and you nurture it

and for one moment — 

at least — 

it’s real. 

Your dream, 

a reality. 

So even when it becomes more and more difficult

even when you’re starting to know it can’t happen

you won’t let the dream die. 

You hold on and on. 

Darling, do the hard thing. 

Let it die

let it go

You’ll find reality is sweeter when it’s real. 

You’ll see how glorious it is to be unburdened

of a dream that was never meant to be. 

Darling, let it die. 

It’s always hard — 

but, oh, so right — 

to admit you’re wrong. 

Inktober 2019 // poetry snippets

Hello, my friends!

NaNoWriMo is over (and I won, which was stressful but worth it – more on that later). I still have more work to do on my Fiddler novel.  I’m about to start work on my short story and poetry collection. Christmas is coming.

So naturally, I’m sharing some snippets of poetry that I wrote in October using the Inktober prompts.

. . . naturally.

Let’s ignore the fact that the timing of this post doesn’t make much sense and focus instead on the fact that I wrote 31 (34, actually) poems in October, a few of which are worth reading, and that today I’m going to give you the pleasure of seeing some of them.

And let’s begin.

I’ll be sharing quotes from my favorite poems of the month, along with pictures (courtesy of Unsplash) that I’ve chosen to go along with them.


pavement surrounded with dried leaves

day 1: ring

This smell of fall is a whisper,
A glimmer,
A glimpse of your grandeur.
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